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Improvements, Iowa regiments in the Bebellion, Foultry and eggs, Bemarks of manufactur- ers (additional) 866 165859 CONTENTS OP ADDENDA. Beit enacted by the Oeneral Assevribly of the State of lotjoa, That there is hereby created a Bureau of Labor Statistics, to t^e under the control and management of a Commissioner thereof, to be appointed as hereinafter provided by this act. Five thousand copies thereof shall be printed and bound uniformly similar to the reports of other State officers as now authorized by law. The Commissioner shall have power to issue subpoenas for wit- nesses and examine them under oath and enforce their attendance to the same extent and in the same manner as a justice of the ieace; said wit- nesses to be paid the same fees as are now allowed witnesses before a jus- tice of the peace, the same to be paid by the State. On the seventh day of April, 1884, the Governor appointed, and the Executive Council confirmed, E. He is also given three clerks at

Improvements, Iowa regiments in the Bebellion, Foultry and eggs, Bemarks of manufactur- ers (additional) 866 165859 CONTENTS OP ADDENDA. Beit enacted by the Oeneral Assevribly of the State of lotjoa, That there is hereby created a Bureau of Labor Statistics, to t^e under the control and management of a Commissioner thereof, to be appointed as hereinafter provided by this act. Five thousand copies thereof shall be printed and bound uniformly similar to the reports of other State officers as now authorized by law. The Commissioner shall have power to issue subpoenas for wit- nesses and examine them under oath and enforce their attendance to the same extent and in the same manner as a justice of the ieace; said wit- nesses to be paid the same fees as are now allowed witnesses before a jus- tice of the peace, the same to be paid by the State. On the seventh day of April, 1884, the Governor appointed, and the Executive Council confirmed, E. He is also given three clerks at $1,400, and $2,000 for expenses outside of postage, printing, etc. The number of farms increased from 1870 to 1880 50.7 per cent, while the increase of Improved acres was but 31.5 per cent, showing that the settling up of land overspread is going rapidly forward. There is an element of generosity in this policy on their part that commands our respect, but a policy that produces such results is certainly a mistaken one. In this connection, I present the following statistics on this subject taken from a publication of the State Department at Washington, from TJ« S. 1 192 REPORT OF THE [E6 VALUE, RENTALS, AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, BY COUNTIES. 4 320 160 160 133 120 192 148 180 66 160 280 133 80 160 246 196 177 163 IWH 142 140 360 142 140 34 65 140 236 6 6 6 8 8^ 8 10 7 13 6 6 6 10 6 8 6 3 6 8 9 7 7 10 3 6 10 3)^ 6 3 6 4H Iowa Jackson Jasper Jefferson Johnson Jones Keokuk Kossuth (See note B) Lee. Thus we manage 1,000 acres, with lour men living in tenant houses rent free, some trmt free, boarding themselves and families, Wa^es casl^ on ^emm^f $1'25 per day. Allamakee— Waukon, Postville, Lansing, Dorchester, and Harper's Ferry. Opinions of coal operators regarding coal screens (additional) 870 Statistics of manufacturers 875 Third Annual Convention of Commissioners and Chiefs 866 •. CHAPTER 132, LAWS OF THE TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEM- BLY. Said reiorts, when published, to be disposed of as follows, viz.: To the public libraries in the State, to the various trade organizations, agricultural and mechani- cal societies, and other places where the Commissioner may deem proper an(l best calculated to accomplish the furiiherance of the industrial inter- ests of the State. Illinois is composed of five Commissioners and a secretary. In 1860 we grew of all animals 2.9 per capita; in 1870, 2.2; in 1880, 2.7, and in 1884, 2.5 per capita. The greatest surplus of miners prevails in those districts where most money is earned for a day's work. Consular Reports: 190 BEPOBT OF THE [E5 Wagespo^ AGBICULTUBAL WAGES. Much attention paid to drainage and to improvement of live stock. ■ ' 1 i 6 4 4 7 4 1 1 360 600 262 276 10 3 2 3 1 2^ 1 1 _.-. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Number of days lost during the year— not including holidays 30. What class of employes do you have the most trouble in getting? For what employment do you have the most applicants? Did you have any accidents in your establishments during the year end- ing June 30, 1884, and if so, state number, extent of injuries, and cause of same REMARKS. STATE OF IOWA, Office of Commissionbr of Labor Statistics Dbs Moinbs, :\ Dear Sir: The last General Assembly created a Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics and provided that the Commissioner should ^'collect, assort, sys- tematize and present in biennial reports, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the State, especially in its relations to the commer- cial, social, educational and sanitary conditions of the laboring classes, and to the permanent prosperity of the mechanical, manufacturing and produc- tive industries of the State." Your attention is respectfully asked to the blank accompanying this. A liberal response will demonstrate a creditable public spirit and render much valuable information to the State. What wages are paid to farm laborers in your locality when employed for the year? It is a matter of serious concern that the monthly and yearly wages of the miners in nearly all of the districts run as low as they at present do, but the testimony shows that it is not the daily earnings that are at fault. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Average annual earnings of women from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884. Wages paid to boys and girls per week Boys Girls 27. Have wages been increased or reduced from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884 How much? • *The dates on these blanks and all others were chanp^ed from time to time, hut in all cases, to include one year. Have men employed in any of the different branches of your establish- me^t engaged in any strike since June 30, 1883? This will be sent to gen- tlemen whose names have been given me as active and public spirited, and likely to respond to questions of interest to agriculture. The object of this work is to obtain reliable information regarding the resources of the State and sundry matters of interest to our industries, to enable the Commissioner to place such information before the many enquir- ers from other sections, and to aid in developing the agricultural as well as other interests of Iowa. It is even true that where the conditions of the coal and the rates of mining render possible the largest daily earnings, the yearly wages may run low* est. Laborers 4.26 10 3.76 10 3.37H 10 3.25 10 1.76 10 1.92 10 1.06? • Plasterers 3.57 1.96 2.60 3.75 1.66X 10 Mortar-makers 10 Painters 10 Plumbers - 10 Laborers .............. Google This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. Some of the witnesses frankly avow that their interest in a change is dependent on such advance.

||

Improvements, Iowa regiments in the Bebellion, Foultry and eggs, Bemarks of manufactur- ers (additional) 866 165859 CONTENTS OP ADDENDA. Beit enacted by the Oeneral Assevribly of the State of lotjoa, That there is hereby created a Bureau of Labor Statistics, to t^e under the control and management of a Commissioner thereof, to be appointed as hereinafter provided by this act. Five thousand copies thereof shall be printed and bound uniformly similar to the reports of other State officers as now authorized by law. The Commissioner shall have power to issue subpoenas for wit- nesses and examine them under oath and enforce their attendance to the same extent and in the same manner as a justice of the ieace; said wit- nesses to be paid the same fees as are now allowed witnesses before a jus- tice of the peace, the same to be paid by the State. On the seventh day of April, 1884, the Governor appointed, and the Executive Council confirmed, E. He is also given three clerks at $1,400, and $2,000 for expenses outside of postage, printing, etc. The number of farms increased from 1870 to 1880 50.7 per cent, while the increase of Improved acres was but 31.5 per cent, showing that the settling up of land overspread is going rapidly forward. There is an element of generosity in this policy on their part that commands our respect, but a policy that produces such results is certainly a mistaken one. In this connection, I present the following statistics on this subject taken from a publication of the State Department at Washington, from TJ« S. 1 192 REPORT OF THE [E6 VALUE, RENTALS, AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, BY COUNTIES. 4 320 160 160 133 120 192 148 180 66 160 280 133 80 160 246 196 177 163 IWH 142 140 360 142 140 34 65 140 236 6 6 6 8 8^ 8 10 7 13 6 6 6 10 6 8 6 3 6 8 9 7 7 10 3 6 10 3)^ 6 3 6 4H Iowa Jackson Jasper Jefferson Johnson Jones Keokuk Kossuth (See note B) Lee. Thus we manage 1,000 acres, with lour men living in tenant houses rent free, some trmt free, boarding themselves and families, Wa^es casl^ on ^emm^f $1'25 per day. Allamakee— Waukon, Postville, Lansing, Dorchester, and Harper's Ferry.

Opinions of coal operators regarding coal screens (additional) 870 Statistics of manufacturers 875 Third Annual Convention of Commissioners and Chiefs 866 •. CHAPTER 132, LAWS OF THE TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEM- BLY. Said reiorts, when published, to be disposed of as follows, viz.: To the public libraries in the State, to the various trade organizations, agricultural and mechani- cal societies, and other places where the Commissioner may deem proper an(l best calculated to accomplish the furiiherance of the industrial inter- ests of the State. Illinois is composed of five Commissioners and a secretary. In 1860 we grew of all animals 2.9 per capita; in 1870, 2.2; in 1880, 2.7, and in 1884, 2.5 per capita. The greatest surplus of miners prevails in those districts where most money is earned for a day's work. Consular Reports: 190 BEPOBT OF THE [E5 Wagespo^ AGBICULTUBAL WAGES. Much attention paid to drainage and to improvement of live stock. ■ ' 1 i 6 4 4 7 4 1 1 360 600 262 276 10 3 2 3 1 2^ 1 1 _.-.

A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Number of days lost during the year— not including holidays 30. What class of employes do you have the most trouble in getting? For what employment do you have the most applicants? Did you have any accidents in your establishments during the year end- ing June 30, 1884, and if so, state number, extent of injuries, and cause of same REMARKS. STATE OF IOWA, Office of Commissionbr of Labor Statistics Dbs Moinbs, :\ Dear Sir: The last General Assembly created a Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics and provided that the Commissioner should ^'collect, assort, sys- tematize and present in biennial reports, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the State, especially in its relations to the commer- cial, social, educational and sanitary conditions of the laboring classes, and to the permanent prosperity of the mechanical, manufacturing and produc- tive industries of the State." Your attention is respectfully asked to the blank accompanying this. A liberal response will demonstrate a creditable public spirit and render much valuable information to the State. What wages are paid to farm laborers in your locality when employed for the year? It is a matter of serious concern that the monthly and yearly wages of the miners in nearly all of the districts run as low as they at present do, but the testimony shows that it is not the daily earnings that are at fault.

Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Average annual earnings of women from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884. Wages paid to boys and girls per week Boys Girls 27. Have wages been increased or reduced from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884 How much? • *The dates on these blanks and all others were chanp^ed from time to time, hut in all cases, to include one year. Have men employed in any of the different branches of your establish- me^t engaged in any strike since June 30, 1883? This will be sent to gen- tlemen whose names have been given me as active and public spirited, and likely to respond to questions of interest to agriculture. The object of this work is to obtain reliable information regarding the resources of the State and sundry matters of interest to our industries, to enable the Commissioner to place such information before the many enquir- ers from other sections, and to aid in developing the agricultural as well as other interests of Iowa. It is even true that where the conditions of the coal and the rates of mining render possible the largest daily earnings, the yearly wages may run low* est. Laborers 4.26 10 3.76 10 3.37H 10 3.25 10 1.76 10 1.92 10 1.06? • Plasterers 3.57 1.96 2.60 3.75 1.66X 10 Mortar-makers 10 Painters 10 Plumbers - 10 Laborers ..............

Google This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. Some of the witnesses frankly avow that their interest in a change is dependent on such advance.

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. Sites in your county offering natural or acquired advantages for the pro- fitable location and operation of different branches of industry Ans 2. A redintribution of wages without an increase seemed to the most of those 10 whom it was proposed *^a barren ideality," and not worth the trouble it would cost. [E 5 Some, it is true, were willing to forego immediate advantage in the expec- tation of ultimate gain from the change, but what the majority ask, is a higher price for their labor.

,400, and ,000 for expenses outside of postage, printing, etc. The number of farms increased from 1870 to 1880 50.7 per cent, while the increase of Improved acres was but 31.5 per cent, showing that the settling up of land overspread is going rapidly forward. There is an element of generosity in this policy on their part that commands our respect, but a policy that produces such results is certainly a mistaken one. In this connection, I present the following statistics on this subject taken from a publication of the State Department at Washington, from TJ« S. 1 192 REPORT OF THE [E6 VALUE, RENTALS, AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, BY COUNTIES. 4 320 160 160 133 120 192 148 180 66 160 280 133 80 160 246 196 177 163 IWH 142 140 360 142 140 34 65 140 236 6 6 6 8 8^ 8 10 7 13 6 6 6 10 6 8 6 3 6 8 9 7 7 10 3 6 10 3)^ 6 3 6 4H Iowa Jackson Jasper Jefferson Johnson Jones Keokuk Kossuth (See note B) Lee. Thus we manage 1,000 acres, with lour men living in tenant houses rent free, some trmt free, boarding themselves and families, Wa^es casl^ on ^emm^f

Improvements, Iowa regiments in the Bebellion, Foultry and eggs, Bemarks of manufactur- ers (additional) 866 165859 CONTENTS OP ADDENDA. Beit enacted by the Oeneral Assevribly of the State of lotjoa, That there is hereby created a Bureau of Labor Statistics, to t^e under the control and management of a Commissioner thereof, to be appointed as hereinafter provided by this act. Five thousand copies thereof shall be printed and bound uniformly similar to the reports of other State officers as now authorized by law. The Commissioner shall have power to issue subpoenas for wit- nesses and examine them under oath and enforce their attendance to the same extent and in the same manner as a justice of the ieace; said wit- nesses to be paid the same fees as are now allowed witnesses before a jus- tice of the peace, the same to be paid by the State. On the seventh day of April, 1884, the Governor appointed, and the Executive Council confirmed, E. He is also given three clerks at $1,400, and $2,000 for expenses outside of postage, printing, etc. The number of farms increased from 1870 to 1880 50.7 per cent, while the increase of Improved acres was but 31.5 per cent, showing that the settling up of land overspread is going rapidly forward. There is an element of generosity in this policy on their part that commands our respect, but a policy that produces such results is certainly a mistaken one. In this connection, I present the following statistics on this subject taken from a publication of the State Department at Washington, from TJ« S. 1 192 REPORT OF THE [E6 VALUE, RENTALS, AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, BY COUNTIES. 4 320 160 160 133 120 192 148 180 66 160 280 133 80 160 246 196 177 163 IWH 142 140 360 142 140 34 65 140 236 6 6 6 8 8^ 8 10 7 13 6 6 6 10 6 8 6 3 6 8 9 7 7 10 3 6 10 3)^ 6 3 6 4H Iowa Jackson Jasper Jefferson Johnson Jones Keokuk Kossuth (See note B) Lee. Thus we manage 1,000 acres, with lour men living in tenant houses rent free, some trmt free, boarding themselves and families, Wa^es casl^ on ^emm^f $1'25 per day. Allamakee— Waukon, Postville, Lansing, Dorchester, and Harper's Ferry. Opinions of coal operators regarding coal screens (additional) 870 Statistics of manufacturers 875 Third Annual Convention of Commissioners and Chiefs 866 •. CHAPTER 132, LAWS OF THE TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEM- BLY. Said reiorts, when published, to be disposed of as follows, viz.: To the public libraries in the State, to the various trade organizations, agricultural and mechani- cal societies, and other places where the Commissioner may deem proper an(l best calculated to accomplish the furiiherance of the industrial inter- ests of the State. Illinois is composed of five Commissioners and a secretary. In 1860 we grew of all animals 2.9 per capita; in 1870, 2.2; in 1880, 2.7, and in 1884, 2.5 per capita. The greatest surplus of miners prevails in those districts where most money is earned for a day's work. Consular Reports: 190 BEPOBT OF THE [E5 Wagespo^ AGBICULTUBAL WAGES. Much attention paid to drainage and to improvement of live stock. ■ ' 1 i 6 4 4 7 4 1 1 360 600 262 276 10 3 2 3 1 2^ 1 1 _.-. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Number of days lost during the year— not including holidays 30. What class of employes do you have the most trouble in getting? For what employment do you have the most applicants? Did you have any accidents in your establishments during the year end- ing June 30, 1884, and if so, state number, extent of injuries, and cause of same REMARKS. STATE OF IOWA, Office of Commissionbr of Labor Statistics Dbs Moinbs, :\ Dear Sir: The last General Assembly created a Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics and provided that the Commissioner should ^'collect, assort, sys- tematize and present in biennial reports, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the State, especially in its relations to the commer- cial, social, educational and sanitary conditions of the laboring classes, and to the permanent prosperity of the mechanical, manufacturing and produc- tive industries of the State." Your attention is respectfully asked to the blank accompanying this. A liberal response will demonstrate a creditable public spirit and render much valuable information to the State. What wages are paid to farm laborers in your locality when employed for the year? It is a matter of serious concern that the monthly and yearly wages of the miners in nearly all of the districts run as low as they at present do, but the testimony shows that it is not the daily earnings that are at fault. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Average annual earnings of women from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884. Wages paid to boys and girls per week Boys Girls 27. Have wages been increased or reduced from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884 How much? • *The dates on these blanks and all others were chanp^ed from time to time, hut in all cases, to include one year. Have men employed in any of the different branches of your establish- me^t engaged in any strike since June 30, 1883? This will be sent to gen- tlemen whose names have been given me as active and public spirited, and likely to respond to questions of interest to agriculture. The object of this work is to obtain reliable information regarding the resources of the State and sundry matters of interest to our industries, to enable the Commissioner to place such information before the many enquir- ers from other sections, and to aid in developing the agricultural as well as other interests of Iowa. It is even true that where the conditions of the coal and the rates of mining render possible the largest daily earnings, the yearly wages may run low* est. Laborers 4.26 10 3.76 10 3.37H 10 3.25 10 1.76 10 1.92 10 1.06? • Plasterers 3.57 1.96 2.60 3.75 1.66X 10 Mortar-makers 10 Painters 10 Plumbers - 10 Laborers .............. Google This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. Some of the witnesses frankly avow that their interest in a change is dependent on such advance.

||

Improvements, Iowa regiments in the Bebellion, Foultry and eggs, Bemarks of manufactur- ers (additional) 866 165859 CONTENTS OP ADDENDA. Beit enacted by the Oeneral Assevribly of the State of lotjoa, That there is hereby created a Bureau of Labor Statistics, to t^e under the control and management of a Commissioner thereof, to be appointed as hereinafter provided by this act. Five thousand copies thereof shall be printed and bound uniformly similar to the reports of other State officers as now authorized by law. The Commissioner shall have power to issue subpoenas for wit- nesses and examine them under oath and enforce their attendance to the same extent and in the same manner as a justice of the ieace; said wit- nesses to be paid the same fees as are now allowed witnesses before a jus- tice of the peace, the same to be paid by the State. On the seventh day of April, 1884, the Governor appointed, and the Executive Council confirmed, E. He is also given three clerks at $1,400, and $2,000 for expenses outside of postage, printing, etc. The number of farms increased from 1870 to 1880 50.7 per cent, while the increase of Improved acres was but 31.5 per cent, showing that the settling up of land overspread is going rapidly forward. There is an element of generosity in this policy on their part that commands our respect, but a policy that produces such results is certainly a mistaken one. In this connection, I present the following statistics on this subject taken from a publication of the State Department at Washington, from TJ« S. 1 192 REPORT OF THE [E6 VALUE, RENTALS, AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, BY COUNTIES. 4 320 160 160 133 120 192 148 180 66 160 280 133 80 160 246 196 177 163 IWH 142 140 360 142 140 34 65 140 236 6 6 6 8 8^ 8 10 7 13 6 6 6 10 6 8 6 3 6 8 9 7 7 10 3 6 10 3)^ 6 3 6 4H Iowa Jackson Jasper Jefferson Johnson Jones Keokuk Kossuth (See note B) Lee. Thus we manage 1,000 acres, with lour men living in tenant houses rent free, some trmt free, boarding themselves and families, Wa^es casl^ on ^emm^f $1'25 per day. Allamakee— Waukon, Postville, Lansing, Dorchester, and Harper's Ferry.

Opinions of coal operators regarding coal screens (additional) 870 Statistics of manufacturers 875 Third Annual Convention of Commissioners and Chiefs 866 •. CHAPTER 132, LAWS OF THE TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEM- BLY. Said reiorts, when published, to be disposed of as follows, viz.: To the public libraries in the State, to the various trade organizations, agricultural and mechani- cal societies, and other places where the Commissioner may deem proper an(l best calculated to accomplish the furiiherance of the industrial inter- ests of the State. Illinois is composed of five Commissioners and a secretary. In 1860 we grew of all animals 2.9 per capita; in 1870, 2.2; in 1880, 2.7, and in 1884, 2.5 per capita. The greatest surplus of miners prevails in those districts where most money is earned for a day's work. Consular Reports: 190 BEPOBT OF THE [E5 Wagespo^ AGBICULTUBAL WAGES. Much attention paid to drainage and to improvement of live stock. ■ ' 1 i 6 4 4 7 4 1 1 360 600 262 276 10 3 2 3 1 2^ 1 1 _.-.

A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Number of days lost during the year— not including holidays 30. What class of employes do you have the most trouble in getting? For what employment do you have the most applicants? Did you have any accidents in your establishments during the year end- ing June 30, 1884, and if so, state number, extent of injuries, and cause of same REMARKS. STATE OF IOWA, Office of Commissionbr of Labor Statistics Dbs Moinbs, :\ Dear Sir: The last General Assembly created a Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics and provided that the Commissioner should ^'collect, assort, sys- tematize and present in biennial reports, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the State, especially in its relations to the commer- cial, social, educational and sanitary conditions of the laboring classes, and to the permanent prosperity of the mechanical, manufacturing and produc- tive industries of the State." Your attention is respectfully asked to the blank accompanying this. A liberal response will demonstrate a creditable public spirit and render much valuable information to the State. What wages are paid to farm laborers in your locality when employed for the year? It is a matter of serious concern that the monthly and yearly wages of the miners in nearly all of the districts run as low as they at present do, but the testimony shows that it is not the daily earnings that are at fault.

Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Average annual earnings of women from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884. Wages paid to boys and girls per week Boys Girls 27. Have wages been increased or reduced from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884 How much? • *The dates on these blanks and all others were chanp^ed from time to time, hut in all cases, to include one year. Have men employed in any of the different branches of your establish- me^t engaged in any strike since June 30, 1883? This will be sent to gen- tlemen whose names have been given me as active and public spirited, and likely to respond to questions of interest to agriculture. The object of this work is to obtain reliable information regarding the resources of the State and sundry matters of interest to our industries, to enable the Commissioner to place such information before the many enquir- ers from other sections, and to aid in developing the agricultural as well as other interests of Iowa. It is even true that where the conditions of the coal and the rates of mining render possible the largest daily earnings, the yearly wages may run low* est. Laborers 4.26 10 3.76 10 3.37H 10 3.25 10 1.76 10 1.92 10 1.06? • Plasterers 3.57 1.96 2.60 3.75 1.66X 10 Mortar-makers 10 Painters 10 Plumbers - 10 Laborers ..............

Google This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. Some of the witnesses frankly avow that their interest in a change is dependent on such advance.

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. Sites in your county offering natural or acquired advantages for the pro- fitable location and operation of different branches of industry Ans 2. A redintribution of wages without an increase seemed to the most of those 10 whom it was proposed *^a barren ideality," and not worth the trouble it would cost. [E 5 Some, it is true, were willing to forego immediate advantage in the expec- tation of ultimate gain from the change, but what the majority ask, is a higher price for their labor.

'25 per day. Allamakee— Waukon, Postville, Lansing, Dorchester, and Harper's Ferry. Opinions of coal operators regarding coal screens (additional) 870 Statistics of manufacturers 875 Third Annual Convention of Commissioners and Chiefs 866 •. CHAPTER 132, LAWS OF THE TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEM- BLY. Said reiorts, when published, to be disposed of as follows, viz.: To the public libraries in the State, to the various trade organizations, agricultural and mechani- cal societies, and other places where the Commissioner may deem proper an(l best calculated to accomplish the furiiherance of the industrial inter- ests of the State. Illinois is composed of five Commissioners and a secretary. In 1860 we grew of all animals 2.9 per capita; in 1870, 2.2; in 1880, 2.7, and in 1884, 2.5 per capita. The greatest surplus of miners prevails in those districts where most money is earned for a day's work. Consular Reports: 190 BEPOBT OF THE [E5 Wagespo^ AGBICULTUBAL WAGES. Much attention paid to drainage and to improvement of live stock. ■ ' 1 i 6 4 4 7 4 1 1 360 600 262 276 10 3 2 3 1 2^ 1 1 _.-. A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Number of days lost during the year— not including holidays 30. What class of employes do you have the most trouble in getting? For what employment do you have the most applicants? Did you have any accidents in your establishments during the year end- ing June 30, 1884, and if so, state number, extent of injuries, and cause of same REMARKS. STATE OF IOWA, Office of Commissionbr of Labor Statistics Dbs Moinbs, :\ Dear Sir: The last General Assembly created a Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics and provided that the Commissioner should ^'collect, assort, sys- tematize and present in biennial reports, statistical details relating to all departments of labor in the State, especially in its relations to the commer- cial, social, educational and sanitary conditions of the laboring classes, and to the permanent prosperity of the mechanical, manufacturing and produc- tive industries of the State." Your attention is respectfully asked to the blank accompanying this. A liberal response will demonstrate a creditable public spirit and render much valuable information to the State. What wages are paid to farm laborers in your locality when employed for the year? It is a matter of serious concern that the monthly and yearly wages of the miners in nearly all of the districts run as low as they at present do, but the testimony shows that it is not the daily earnings that are at fault. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Average annual earnings of women from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884. Wages paid to boys and girls per week Boys Girls 27. Have wages been increased or reduced from June 30, 1883, to June 30, 1884 How much? • *The dates on these blanks and all others were chanp^ed from time to time, hut in all cases, to include one year. Have men employed in any of the different branches of your establish- me^t engaged in any strike since June 30, 1883? This will be sent to gen- tlemen whose names have been given me as active and public spirited, and likely to respond to questions of interest to agriculture. The object of this work is to obtain reliable information regarding the resources of the State and sundry matters of interest to our industries, to enable the Commissioner to place such information before the many enquir- ers from other sections, and to aid in developing the agricultural as well as other interests of Iowa. It is even true that where the conditions of the coal and the rates of mining render possible the largest daily earnings, the yearly wages may run low* est. Laborers 4.26 10 3.76 10 3.37H 10 3.25 10 1.76 10 1.92 10 1.06? • Plasterers 3.57 1.96 2.60 3.75 1.66X 10 Mortar-makers 10 Painters 10 Plumbers - 10 Laborers .............. Google This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. Some of the witnesses frankly avow that their interest in a change is dependent on such advance.

bathroom-blowjob

bathroom-blowjob

One third of the country lies west of the one hundredth meridian. It also complies with the third requirement, in discriminating in favor of the skilled miner, but the majority of the Commission find it falls so far short under the fourth head, that, in their judgment, it must be ruled out of present account, it seems to them that it would prove troublesome, if not impracticable, in execution. They are Si»tisfied that in present markets the operator's highest interest is in large coal, and they see no better way of securing large coal than by making it to the miner's interest to produce it, by paying him at least more for it than for other grades. They believe that there is such a thing as a fair day's wages for the miner of coal. 31.67 26.20 28.00 37.50 39.00 26.00 40.00 23.06 38 40 37 60 35 45 60 Wright 46 RECAPITULATION. Bayis— Fine grass country; better adapted for grazing than anything else. The price of coal for the last four years ranging from

One third of the country lies west of the one hundredth meridian. It also complies with the third requirement, in discriminating in favor of the skilled miner, but the majority of the Commission find it falls so far short under the fourth head, that, in their judgment, it must be ruled out of present account, it seems to them that it would prove troublesome, if not impracticable, in execution. They are Si»tisfied that in present markets the operator's highest interest is in large coal, and they see no better way of securing large coal than by making it to the miner's interest to produce it, by paying him at least more for it than for other grades. They believe that there is such a thing as a fair day's wages for the miner of coal. 31.67 26.20 28.00 37.50 39.00 26.00 40.00 23.06 38 40 37 60 35 45 60 Wright 46 RECAPITULATION. Bayis— Fine grass country; better adapted for grazing than anything else. The price of coal for the last four years ranging from $1.40 to $1.90 per ton. 197 Maquoketa valley and several lime kilns in operation.

West of the above line only 28,486,089 acres are found. A scale could be fixed for screens of any size and for coals of any kind. The Missouri ore and pig iron can be brought from St. There is here gathered a large quantity of scrap iron, which would form a large part of the supply for foundries and rolling mills. On west branch of Des Moines river a cheese factory is needed. Direct connection by rail is now had with Watertown, Dak. Splendid water- power at Charles City, also at Floyd on the Cedar river, and in Miles township on the Little Sioux. Fine mill privilege at Shef- ^eld and a mill badly needed. Gbi;ene— Splendid coal and water privileges and fine opportimity for •canning factory in Washington township. Guthrie— A canning factory would pay well at Guthrie Center. A flouring mill is needed very ^uch at Lime creek or Upper Grove. We especiailly need factories to consume our products nearer home. We need here (New London) a competing line of railroad going north and south. Jefferson— This county presents many natural [advantages for all kinds, of manufacturing, and as a grazing country is not excelled by any portion of the United States.

What of the half area east of the one hundredth meridian not in farms? It is found, however, in practice that in placing the entire wages on one grade, an element of trouble is introduced. Our location presents an excellent opening for all kinds of manufactures, especi- ally stove foundries, nail and rolling mills, pork houses, rope, oatmeal, drain tile, and sorghum establishments. Mining has been profitable years ago, but latterly not as much so. Cascade town- ship has a natural dam of rock in the Maquoketa river but little used as yet. I be- lieve that our county seat— Guthrie Center— possesses superior advantages for the establishment of a pork packing center, and that a plant of that industry would be remunerative. A man who will build' a steam flour- ing mill will do well. How ABD— Stock raising and dairying on the increase, and found to be very profitable. Horse raising is rapidly becoming a principal in- dustry.

Our dairy products per capita are about what they were in 1850. To adopt any policy by which present markets would be lost or weakened would doubtless increase the evils of the situation, for the cause of the present trouble clearly is, not that not enough is paid for mining a ton of coal, but that there are not tons enough to mine. / Appanoose— We have a great quantity of coal and timber, and fine stone for building purposes, thus affording strong inducements for manufacturers. Bents about, and in Clinton are low, and the facilities for shipping of products by rail excellent.

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One third of the country lies west of the one hundredth meridian. It also complies with the third requirement, in discriminating in favor of the skilled miner, but the majority of the Commission find it falls so far short under the fourth head, that, in their judgment, it must be ruled out of present account, it seems to them that it would prove troublesome, if not impracticable, in execution. They are Si»tisfied that in present markets the operator's highest interest is in large coal, and they see no better way of securing large coal than by making it to the miner's interest to produce it, by paying him at least more for it than for other grades. They believe that there is such a thing as a fair day's wages for the miner of coal. 31.67 26.20 28.00 37.50 39.00 26.00 40.00 23.06 38 40 37 60 35 45 60 Wright 46 RECAPITULATION. Bayis— Fine grass country; better adapted for grazing than anything else. The price of coal for the last four years ranging from $1.40 to $1.90 per ton. 197 Maquoketa valley and several lime kilns in operation. West of the above line only 28,486,089 acres are found. A scale could be fixed for screens of any size and for coals of any kind. The Missouri ore and pig iron can be brought from St. There is here gathered a large quantity of scrap iron, which would form a large part of the supply for foundries and rolling mills. On west branch of Des Moines river a cheese factory is needed. Direct connection by rail is now had with Watertown, Dak. Splendid water- power at Charles City, also at Floyd on the Cedar river, and in Miles township on the Little Sioux. Fine mill privilege at Shef- ^eld and a mill badly needed. Gbi;ene— Splendid coal and water privileges and fine opportimity for •canning factory in Washington township. Guthrie— A canning factory would pay well at Guthrie Center. A flouring mill is needed very ^uch at Lime creek or Upper Grove. We especiailly need factories to consume our products nearer home. We need here (New London) a competing line of railroad going north and south. Jefferson— This county presents many natural [advantages for all kinds, of manufacturing, and as a grazing country is not excelled by any portion of the United States. What of the half area east of the one hundredth meridian not in farms? It is found, however, in practice that in placing the entire wages on one grade, an element of trouble is introduced. Our location presents an excellent opening for all kinds of manufactures, especi- ally stove foundries, nail and rolling mills, pork houses, rope, oatmeal, drain tile, and sorghum establishments. Mining has been profitable years ago, but latterly not as much so. Cascade town- ship has a natural dam of rock in the Maquoketa river but little used as yet. I be- lieve that our county seat— Guthrie Center— possesses superior advantages for the establishment of a pork packing center, and that a plant of that industry would be remunerative. A man who will build' a steam flour- ing mill will do well. How ABD— Stock raising and dairying on the increase, and found to be very profitable. Horse raising is rapidly becoming a principal in- dustry. Our dairy products per capita are about what they were in 1850. To adopt any policy by which present markets would be lost or weakened would doubtless increase the evils of the situation, for the cause of the present trouble clearly is, not that not enough is paid for mining a ton of coal, but that there are not tons enough to mine. / Appanoose— We have a great quantity of coal and timber, and fine stone for building purposes, thus affording strong inducements for manufacturers. Bents about, and in Clinton are low, and the facilities for shipping of products by rail excellent.

.40 to

One third of the country lies west of the one hundredth meridian. It also complies with the third requirement, in discriminating in favor of the skilled miner, but the majority of the Commission find it falls so far short under the fourth head, that, in their judgment, it must be ruled out of present account, it seems to them that it would prove troublesome, if not impracticable, in execution. They are Si»tisfied that in present markets the operator's highest interest is in large coal, and they see no better way of securing large coal than by making it to the miner's interest to produce it, by paying him at least more for it than for other grades. They believe that there is such a thing as a fair day's wages for the miner of coal. 31.67 26.20 28.00 37.50 39.00 26.00 40.00 23.06 38 40 37 60 35 45 60 Wright 46 RECAPITULATION. Bayis— Fine grass country; better adapted for grazing than anything else. The price of coal for the last four years ranging from $1.40 to $1.90 per ton. 197 Maquoketa valley and several lime kilns in operation.

West of the above line only 28,486,089 acres are found. A scale could be fixed for screens of any size and for coals of any kind. The Missouri ore and pig iron can be brought from St. There is here gathered a large quantity of scrap iron, which would form a large part of the supply for foundries and rolling mills. On west branch of Des Moines river a cheese factory is needed. Direct connection by rail is now had with Watertown, Dak. Splendid water- power at Charles City, also at Floyd on the Cedar river, and in Miles township on the Little Sioux. Fine mill privilege at Shef- ^eld and a mill badly needed. Gbi;ene— Splendid coal and water privileges and fine opportimity for •canning factory in Washington township. Guthrie— A canning factory would pay well at Guthrie Center. A flouring mill is needed very ^uch at Lime creek or Upper Grove. We especiailly need factories to consume our products nearer home. We need here (New London) a competing line of railroad going north and south. Jefferson— This county presents many natural [advantages for all kinds, of manufacturing, and as a grazing country is not excelled by any portion of the United States.

What of the half area east of the one hundredth meridian not in farms? It is found, however, in practice that in placing the entire wages on one grade, an element of trouble is introduced. Our location presents an excellent opening for all kinds of manufactures, especi- ally stove foundries, nail and rolling mills, pork houses, rope, oatmeal, drain tile, and sorghum establishments. Mining has been profitable years ago, but latterly not as much so. Cascade town- ship has a natural dam of rock in the Maquoketa river but little used as yet. I be- lieve that our county seat— Guthrie Center— possesses superior advantages for the establishment of a pork packing center, and that a plant of that industry would be remunerative. A man who will build' a steam flour- ing mill will do well. How ABD— Stock raising and dairying on the increase, and found to be very profitable. Horse raising is rapidly becoming a principal in- dustry.

Our dairy products per capita are about what they were in 1850. To adopt any policy by which present markets would be lost or weakened would doubtless increase the evils of the situation, for the cause of the present trouble clearly is, not that not enough is paid for mining a ton of coal, but that there are not tons enough to mine. / Appanoose— We have a great quantity of coal and timber, and fine stone for building purposes, thus affording strong inducements for manufacturers. Bents about, and in Clinton are low, and the facilities for shipping of products by rail excellent.

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One third of the country lies west of the one hundredth meridian. It also complies with the third requirement, in discriminating in favor of the skilled miner, but the majority of the Commission find it falls so far short under the fourth head, that, in their judgment, it must be ruled out of present account, it seems to them that it would prove troublesome, if not impracticable, in execution. They are Si»tisfied that in present markets the operator's highest interest is in large coal, and they see no better way of securing large coal than by making it to the miner's interest to produce it, by paying him at least more for it than for other grades. They believe that there is such a thing as a fair day's wages for the miner of coal. 31.67 26.20 28.00 37.50 39.00 26.00 40.00 23.06 38 40 37 60 35 45 60 Wright 46 RECAPITULATION. Bayis— Fine grass country; better adapted for grazing than anything else. The price of coal for the last four years ranging from $1.40 to $1.90 per ton. 197 Maquoketa valley and several lime kilns in operation. West of the above line only 28,486,089 acres are found. A scale could be fixed for screens of any size and for coals of any kind. The Missouri ore and pig iron can be brought from St. There is here gathered a large quantity of scrap iron, which would form a large part of the supply for foundries and rolling mills. On west branch of Des Moines river a cheese factory is needed. Direct connection by rail is now had with Watertown, Dak. Splendid water- power at Charles City, also at Floyd on the Cedar river, and in Miles township on the Little Sioux. Fine mill privilege at Shef- ^eld and a mill badly needed. Gbi;ene— Splendid coal and water privileges and fine opportimity for •canning factory in Washington township. Guthrie— A canning factory would pay well at Guthrie Center. A flouring mill is needed very ^uch at Lime creek or Upper Grove. We especiailly need factories to consume our products nearer home. We need here (New London) a competing line of railroad going north and south. Jefferson— This county presents many natural [advantages for all kinds, of manufacturing, and as a grazing country is not excelled by any portion of the United States. What of the half area east of the one hundredth meridian not in farms? It is found, however, in practice that in placing the entire wages on one grade, an element of trouble is introduced. Our location presents an excellent opening for all kinds of manufactures, especi- ally stove foundries, nail and rolling mills, pork houses, rope, oatmeal, drain tile, and sorghum establishments. Mining has been profitable years ago, but latterly not as much so. Cascade town- ship has a natural dam of rock in the Maquoketa river but little used as yet. I be- lieve that our county seat— Guthrie Center— possesses superior advantages for the establishment of a pork packing center, and that a plant of that industry would be remunerative. A man who will build' a steam flour- ing mill will do well. How ABD— Stock raising and dairying on the increase, and found to be very profitable. Horse raising is rapidly becoming a principal in- dustry. Our dairy products per capita are about what they were in 1850. To adopt any policy by which present markets would be lost or weakened would doubtless increase the evils of the situation, for the cause of the present trouble clearly is, not that not enough is paid for mining a ton of coal, but that there are not tons enough to mine. / Appanoose— We have a great quantity of coal and timber, and fine stone for building purposes, thus affording strong inducements for manufacturers. Bents about, and in Clinton are low, and the facilities for shipping of products by rail excellent.

.90 per ton. 197 Maquoketa valley and several lime kilns in operation.

West of the above line only 28,486,089 acres are found. A scale could be fixed for screens of any size and for coals of any kind. The Missouri ore and pig iron can be brought from St. There is here gathered a large quantity of scrap iron, which would form a large part of the supply for foundries and rolling mills. On west branch of Des Moines river a cheese factory is needed. Direct connection by rail is now had with Watertown, Dak. Splendid water- power at Charles City, also at Floyd on the Cedar river, and in Miles township on the Little Sioux. Fine mill privilege at Shef- ^eld and a mill badly needed. Gbi;ene— Splendid coal and water privileges and fine opportimity for •canning factory in Washington township. Guthrie— A canning factory would pay well at Guthrie Center. A flouring mill is needed very ^uch at Lime creek or Upper Grove. We especiailly need factories to consume our products nearer home. We need here (New London) a competing line of railroad going north and south. Jefferson— This county presents many natural [advantages for all kinds, of manufacturing, and as a grazing country is not excelled by any portion of the United States.

What of the half area east of the one hundredth meridian not in farms? It is found, however, in practice that in placing the entire wages on one grade, an element of trouble is introduced. Our location presents an excellent opening for all kinds of manufactures, especi- ally stove foundries, nail and rolling mills, pork houses, rope, oatmeal, drain tile, and sorghum establishments. Mining has been profitable years ago, but latterly not as much so. Cascade town- ship has a natural dam of rock in the Maquoketa river but little used as yet. I be- lieve that our county seat— Guthrie Center— possesses superior advantages for the establishment of a pork packing center, and that a plant of that industry would be remunerative. A man who will build' a steam flour- ing mill will do well. How ABD— Stock raising and dairying on the increase, and found to be very profitable. Horse raising is rapidly becoming a principal in- dustry.

Our dairy products per capita are about what they were in 1850. To adopt any policy by which present markets would be lost or weakened would doubtless increase the evils of the situation, for the cause of the present trouble clearly is, not that not enough is paid for mining a ton of coal, but that there are not tons enough to mine. / Appanoose— We have a great quantity of coal and timber, and fine stone for building purposes, thus affording strong inducements for manufacturers. Bents about, and in Clinton are low, and the facilities for shipping of products by rail excellent.

bathroom-blowjob

We have 0,000,000 worth of sugar yet to produce, 0,000,000 worth of which 28 BEFOBT OF THE [E 5 we now buy. Of the various districts visited by the Conunission, the condition of the mining population was unquestionably best in those in which work was steady while the daily earnings were moderate. The rates paid for mining in Ohio to-day would in every instance give a decent living to the miner if steady work could be furnished to him.' In some districts, steady work at present rates would give to the coal miner as high wages as any branch of skilled labor in the State now commands. The creamery and cheese business seems to offerjthe best opening for investment of almost any pursuit. Arcadia would be an excellent place for a flouring mill. The latter would be an excellent point for a canning factory. Clay- Good water power at Spencer, on the Little Sioux river, for almost any industry needing power. The main industry in this city and adjoining is manufacturing lumber. 125 437 500 260 200 460 420 426 395 600 9 3 4 3 5 1 1 1 COUNTY.

The land east of the one hundredth meridian is 968,- 891,089 acres. It is not neces- sary to decide just what such wages would be, but when the time and ex- pense of learning the business, the powers of body and mind brought into use in prosecuting it, and the severity and hazard of the labors attending it, are all taken into account, it will still be possible to find what would be a fair return to the miner as a member of the wage-earning class in any com- mimity. Decatur— Creamery or cheese factory between Lineville and Garden Grove. Iron and material for manufacturing purposes are not far distant. Lime is shipped to- Kansas, i NTebraska, Dakota and all over Iowa.

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